Web browser update: the march of mobile searching continues

Tuesday 20th December 2016   by Stuart Bickerton

which browsers people use in 2016
As the year draws to a close, we thought we’d revisit our regular web browser stats infographic and see how the battle of the browsers is doing.

Once again, the figures, for the end of November 2016, show the march of Chrome here in the UK, at the expense of both  Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and Mozilla’s Firefox.

However, as before, Windows maintains a grip on computer operating systems – Over 75% of people use Windows (that’s an awful lot of blue screens of death!).

We’ve highlighted the importance of mobile and mobile search in recent years. This insistence that mobile cannot be ignored is once again reflected in the web statistics.

The share of market for mobile operating systems has risen over 17% in 12 months, as more people find smart phones and tablets indespendible for an increasing number of activities, including shopping, ordering meals, getting about, and gaming.

 

mobile-browsing-statistics-nov-2016
Don’t forget you can check if Google thinks your website is mobile friendly here https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/mobile-friendly/ . Simply paste your web address in the link box provided.

How to drive customer interest with infographic design

Friday 11th December 2015   by Neil Dicken

Would you believe it? Owners of Audis are most likely to wash their cars, while owners of Mercedes are least likely.

Men are more than twice as likely as women to wash their cars. And 1 in 4 men wash their cars, just to get out of the house.

Admit it, you are intrigued, even if just a little. It is true, if you present an engaging series of facts, people just can’t help but ponder what they mean. Which is where infographic design come in.

Carwash Infographic

Infographics are an ideal and increasingly popular way to present information bite-sized and attractive chunks. They are good for catching the eye, engaging brain, and getting people talking.

To prove the point, one of our graphic designers, Neil – a bit of a car buff – took his inspiration from research undertaken by OSV limited to find a few interesting figures about car washing.

There is growing demand for engaging factual content on websites and apps, often in list form. Simple facts about what interests people the most are easy to remember, and quickest to be shared.

That is why infographic design is in demand. Infographics are a great way to grab the attention of a target audience. They make key facts about your service easier to understand, more persuasive and more readily shared with business colleagues and friends.

So, it appears keeping up appearances on the driveway is largely a male obsession. Unless you are a Peugeot owner in Oxford, that is. Take a quick look at the infographic to see why.

Click on the image, or download it here to view the graphic in full. If you wanted to talk about infographic design with matm, get in touch. If you want to chat about car shampoos, polishing pads and detailing, talk to Neil.

 

In-game advertising – a double-edged sword

Wednesday 18th July 2012   by Andy Comber

Matt Hughes is spending a week doing work experience with us here at matm. He’s 15 and an experienced gamer. So we asked him to look into an increasingly common aspect of the digital leisure world – in-game advertising. Here’re his views:

In the past 10 years, video games have developed exceedingly fast. This has perked the interest of many companies, including, Adidas, MacDonald’s and Intel to use these games as advertising opportunities.

However, the games industry have had mixed feelings on in-game advertisements, as it may be seen as ‘selling out’. This has caused some businesses to lose respect from customers.

Although a lot of businesses have gained millions of dollars from the revenue they have earned from the advertisements. One well known in-game advert was an advertising billboard for the Obama 2008 election in a game called Burnout Paradise.


This billboard was positioned on the side of a main highway, where the players would pass regularly and see the message.

Obama also appeared in NBA Live 08 where he featured on an advertising board with the same ‘EARLY VOTING’ message. It made a regular appearance next to the basketball court, which would have been viewed millions of times by players of the highly popular basketball franchise.

In my personal experience, I have never been put off a game because of it’s in-game adverts.

However if the development company were to extend the amount of adverts they add to their game even more, to the point that it may have advert breaks in the game, or if the game were to have advertising billboard on every available space, I would feel betrayed as a gamer, as I buy games to enjoy them, not to have corporate advertising rammed in my face every five minutes.

I feel that the addition of in-game advertisements adds to the realism as it creates a recognisable atmosphere that is relatable to the player of the game. However, if the developers were to abuse this, they may be criticized by the media, games reviewers and gamers.

Since in-game advertising has arrived in the last couple of years, a lot of game developers have had the ability to produce free-to-play games with no hidden costs or charges.

This has enabled them to use these games as a blank canvas for testing features to use on their new games, for example a game called Team Fortress 2 which was released in 2007, was originally priced at £8, however in early 2012, the game was made free to play.

This has allowed Valve, the game’s developers, to experiment with different features and create a better gaming experience for the future. They have used advertising in their game to help fund the development process and continue to produce new content for the game.

My view is that a lot of smaller, independent games companies could benefit from in-game advertisements because the extra income, which in some cases might be substantial, could offset development costs, making it easier to break into the market.

As well as advertisement, product placement has also become more popular in the gaming industry, with large businesses like Lynx placing their products in games, and well known characters taking Coca Cola from a branded vending machine.

This idea of showing the product in the game has proven very successful for many companies, for example, when Activision released Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, Mountain Dew also released Modern Warfare 3 themed drinks in which were several collectable cards that gamers could trade for in-game items and ‘Experience Boots’.

This boosted the sales of Mountain Dew significantly, as many of the gamers that play Call of Duty will do anything to get ahead of other gamers.

On 15 July 2012, in an article about growing alarm at our increasingly digital world, The Sunday Times said the average British adolescent spends up to 5 hours a day online and 10 to 11-year-olds have access to 5 screens at home.

Advertisers have realised that to reach a target audience, especially the highly prized younger audience, they must place their products where the audience is, and that is increasingly in cyberspace, not the real world.

Advertising on Facebook and Youtube is now the norm, now the ad people are beginning to shift over to games, as they know that a large percentage of the people that use computers regularly in their spare time are gamers.

The upside, is that this new element of the advertising industry is creating thousands of new jobs. The downside is that it is clear we will never escape seeing something we never knew we wanted.

QR codes boost for tourism – and for taking a walk to the pub

Tuesday 28th February 2012   by Andy Comber

Here’s an example of how a bit of technology that, a year ago, was hardly heard of, is now so mainstream that it’s being used to help support the villlage pub.

QR codes, which can be scanned using a mobile phone camera to bring up a link to a web page, are being used to boost rural pubs by promoting walks in the countryside.

The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Partnership has created 12 circular walks that have pubs on each route – and is promoting them using QR codes on posters and beer mats…obviously.

Creating mobile optimised templates in Coffeemail

Wednesday 15th February 2012   by Neil Dicken

With more and more emails being read via smart phones, it has never been more important to consider you mobile subscribers.

matm’s bespoke email/e-shot template, Coffeemail, now supports mobile browsing – allowing for more of your subscribers to enjoy your eshots just as you created them.

Below are examples of templates for a web based layout and a mobile layout:

Mobile Template Example

Hit the ‘contact us’ button above with any questions!