Posters that are out of this world

Friday 19th February 2016   by Neil Dicken

We’re loving these great posters. As a British astronaut hurtles around the Earth at a speed of 17,150 miles per hour (that’s about 5 miles every second!), our interest has been Tim Peake-d by all things celestial.

This week, we’ve been wowed by NASA’s beautifully-designed series of travel posters entitled “Imagination is our window into the future”.

They were produced by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, and hark back to travel posters of a bygone age when seaside resorts, airlines, cruise liners and trains vied for attention with stunning renderings of landmarks and vistas.

This set of travel posters, which managed to be both retro and futuristic, feature the planets Mars, Venus and Jupiter, and the moons Enceladus (described by JPL as Saturn’s vapour-spewing moon) and Titan (another of Saturn’s moons, and about 50% larger than our Moon).

Europa, one of Jupiter’s staggering 62 known moons, is one of the more interesting destinations. Discovered by Galileo in 1610, its thick icy surface is thought to hide a subsurface ocean that bears similar characteristics with geological features on our own planet. This has led to NASA considering Europa as a potential target for setting up a space colony, and could be a target of a deep space mission, rather than the closer, red planet, Mars.

The posters certainly proved hit here at our offices – they are a great example of NASA understanding and communicating  its place in history, whilst giving us a gentle push into accepting that travel within our solar system may well be science fact rather than science fiction in the future.

The full set of posters can be seen at the Jet Propulsion Labaratory site here.

Travel Posters from NASA. We’re loving that!

Ps we were going to do a post explaining the discovery of Einstein’s Gravitational Waves but we found poster design a little easier to explain.

More information about JPL is at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov